Sinker Cypress

sinker-cypress-pulled-from-river-bed

The History of Sinker Cypress

The 19th century was the start of massive growth in the southeast United States. This growth created a need for easy to access and work with building materials.

Coastal areas, which are plentiful in the southeast, were well equipped to handle this demand because of the vast bald cypress forests that populate low lying, swampy areas. These trees had been growing for over 1,000 years, and their slow growth rate caused them to have very tight rings, making them highly desirable due to their strength and sturdiness.

sinker-cypress-pulled-from-river-bed

The History of Sinker Cypress

The 19th century was the start of massive growth in the southeast United States. This growth created a need for easy to access and work with building materials.

Coastal areas, which are plentiful in the southeast, were well equipped to handle this demand because of the vast bald cypress forests that populate low lying, swampy areas. These trees had been growing for over 1,000 years, and their slow growth rate caused them to have very tight rings, making them highly desirable due to their strength and sturdiness.

The Origins of What We Now Call Sinker Cypress

The technology was quite limited centuries ago, so as you can imagine, much of the logging done was bundled together and loaded onto rafts and floated down accessible rivers. This method for transporting logs had a lot of pitfalls, and around 10% of all the cypress trees that were cut ended up lost to time in the Lowcountry’s river systems.

This loss of valuable timber was a blow to our ancestors, but it is a treasure trove of history for people today. Ashley River Lumber is lucky enough to have access to this lost timber with the help of our research and specialty logging team to identify the locations and pull these logs from their watery graves. We take the time to mill and dry the logs correctly to retain the natural beauty of resilience of sinker cypress, pecky cypress, and curly cypress, and more species of wood.

Sinker Cypress is one of the most durable wood products in the Lowcountry, and it is naturally resistant to pests and rot. It has grown in popularity over the years and is often used in interior and exterior projects like paneling, trim work, ceilings, tongue and groove, tabletops, and exposed beams. Contact us to check pricing and availability.

We’re proud to be able to recover these River Recovered Sinker Cypress logs from the rivers of Charleston’s Lowcountry and give them purpose again.

Looking for Other Sinker Wood Species?

We never know what we will find when go go log hunting so check with us often or sign up for our newsletter to keep up to date on what is available.

sinker-cypress-log-in-river
sinker-cypress-table
Scroll to Top