CYPRESS

TAXODIUM DISTICHUM

The wood of Bald Cypress has long been valued for its water resistance, thus is called ‘wood eternal’. The somewhat-mineralized wood is mined from some swamps in the southeast, and is highly prized for specialty uses such as wood carvings, boat building and outdoor structures.

HICKORY

CARYA GLABRA

Durable and resilient, Hickory is a classic North American hardwood. Prized for it’s strength, hardness, and flexibility craftsmen have made any number of items out of Hickory wood including golf club shafts, fishing rods, drum sticks, and other items.

POPLAR

POPULUS BALSAMIFERA

Poplar is suitable for furniture framing, drawers, toys, flooring, boxes and crates, veneers and plywood. Soft, yet versatile. Woolly, yet splinter resistant. Poplar is a time-tested and proven wood for both amateur woodworkers and seasoned furniture makers.

RED OAK

QUERCUS RUBRA

Red Oak is one of the most important oaks for timber production in North America. Construction uses include flooring, veneer, interior trim, and furniture. It is also used for lumber, railroad ties, and fence posts.

PECAN

CARYA ILLIONOINENSIS

Pecan is a species of hickory native to Mexico and southcentral and southeastern United States. Pecan is from an Algonquian word meaning a nut requiring a stone to crack. It is most often used to make furniture or panels used on hardwood walls or floors.

YELLOW PINE

PINUS TAEDA

Yellow Pine, commonly known as loblolly pine, is one of several pines native to the Southeastern United States. For its timber, the pine species is regarded as the most commercially important tree in Southeastern US due to its wide range of uses.

ASH

FRAXINUS CAROLINIANA

Ash is one of the most used trees for everyday purposes. The wood is white and quite dense, strong, and straight-grained. It is the timber of choice for production of baseball bats and tool handles. The wood is also favorable for furniture and flooring. Woodworkers use the timber mainly for internal uses due to high perishability in contact with ground soil.

WHITE OAK

QUERCUS ALBA

White Oak, is one of the pre-eminent hardwoods of eastern North America. White oak has tyloses that give the wood a closed cellular structure, making it water- and rot-resistant. Because of this characteristic, white oak is used for barrels for wine and whiskey production since it resists leaking. It has also been used in construction, shipbuilding, cooperage, and for agricultural implements.

ELM

ULMUS AMERICANA

The Elm tree is highly prized for its aesthetic beauty and durability. Many different items are made from elm wood, including chairs, coffins, and cabinets. Throughout history, elm has been a popular wood chosen by homeowners and cabinet makers alike. During the 19th and 20th century, they were planted throughout many neighborhoods, since these trees create an immense amount of shade.

WHITE GUM

LIQUIDAMBER STYRACIFLUA

White Gum is an important part of the Eastern hardwood forests, and are found throughout the South Eastern USA. The sapwood tends to be wide and is white to light pink, while the heartwood is reddish brown, often with darker streaks. The wood has irregular grain, usually interlocked, which produces an attractive grain figure. It has a fine uniform texture.

SWEET GUM

LIQUIDAMBER STYRACIFLUA

Sweet Gum is one of the most important commercial hardwoods in the Southeastern United States. The sapwood tends to be wide and is white to light pink, while the heartwood is reddish brown, often with darker streaks. It is used for furniture, interior trim, railroad ties, cigar boxes, crates, flooring, barrels, and wood pulp.

WALNUT

JUGLANS REGIA

The common Walnut is important for it’s attractive timber, which is hard, dense, tight-grained and polishes to a very smooth finish. The color ranges from creamy white in the sapwood to a dark chocolate color in the heartwood. When kiln-dried, walnut wood tends toward a dull brown color, but when air-dried can become a rich purplish-brown.